Online Silent Auction Coming Soon!

Great news! The Friends of Murphys Point Park will be hosting our second Online Silent Auction very soon through our Facebook page!

Thanks to some wonderful, generous donors, we will have great items to share again this year! Talented local artisans are contributing beautiful work, and there are few cool quirky things, too!

Stay tuned for all the details and we hope you will take part in this fundraiser to support our activities at Murphys Point.

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Species of the Week: The Northern Saw-whet Owl

The #SpeciesOfTheWeek this week is the Northern Saw-whet Owl (Aegolius acadicus). The Northern Saw-whet Owl is a small owl (about the size of an American Robin) that does not exhibit sexual dimorphism: both males and females are approximately 18-21 cm long, with a wingspan ranging from 42-48 cm. They have mottled brown feathering with white spots on the head and yellow eyes. Although they have a widespread distribution across North America, they are rarely seen due to their secretive nocturnal habits, and preference for dense conifers. In the spring, they can often be located by their distinctive, almost whistled “toot-toot-toot” call. The most common prey of the Northern Saw-whet Owl are deer mice, chipmunks, bats, and voles. On migration, they may supplement their diets with small birds such as chickadees and warblers.

Posted in Friends of Murphys Point, Murphys Point, Murphys Point Provincial Park, Species of the Week | Leave a comment

Species of the Week: The White-tailed Deer

Photo by Murphys Point PP

The White-tailed Deer (Odocoileus virginianus) is our focus for this week’s #SpeciesOfTheWeek. An extremely common mammal at Murphys Point, members of the White-tailed Deer population are often spotted by visitors to the park. Although they make for a cool sighting, the deer population in Ontario has expanded rapidly due to the extirpation of native wolf populations. This expansion has lasting negative effects on the forests due to the deer’s preference for tree saplings and understorey plants in the summer, and bark in the winter. These deer can leap up to 2.5 meters high and 9 meters horizontally, so fencing has little effect. The White-tailed Deer’s coat changes in colour from reddish-brown in the summer to grayish-brown in the winter. The average lifespan of a White-tailed Deer is 6 years in the wild.

Posted in Friends of Murphys Point, Murphys Point, Murphys Point Provincial Park, Species of the Week | Leave a comment